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About Ayohcee

In the spirit of adventure, experimentation and moving forward, I decided that 2019 would be the year to refresh the look of the Ayohcee blog and relocate it to Wix

If it all works out, then the blog will stay there forever. Some of the more popular older posts will be migrated to the Wix site, but all the old posts will still be available here. 

In the meantime, take a look around the new blog and let me know what you think, either there or on Twitter – all constructive feedback is welcome. 

Tomás S. Ó Ceallaigh

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Wild Nights: Camping Britain's Extremes by Phoebe Smith

Cover image © Shutterstock. It’s been nearly two years that I’ve been talking about my desire to go wild camping. So far I’ve bored my parents intermittently and failed to convince any friends to join me. I chanced on an article on the Guardian’s website by Phoebe Smith and realised that wild camping was an actual thing that people actually did. In my own inimitable style, I set about obsessively researching experts, equipment, locations and guides – a process that is still continuing at the time of writing. With this in mind, I looked up Smith’s book Wild Nights: Camping Britain's Extremes . In the book, one of a few that she has penned on the subject of wild camping, she documents her own personal challenge to sleep in a number of extreme places: furthest points of the compass on the UK mainland, the highest/lowest places above/below sea level and the remotest in terms of distance from any roads. Her story begins in Glencoul, Scotland with what should be a bea

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