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Friday Five Questions: Asya Satti, Singer-Songwriter

Photo © www.aysamusic.com
Every so often Twitter can bring to light something a little bit special. This may be anything from something free you never thought of asking for, to a musician starting out in the big bad world of the music industry.

Asya Satti is of Sudanese extraction, but has spent time in both Sweden and Egypt before starting out in music from her North London home. Her website describes her musical and lyrical style as 'unhinged', 'honest' and 'humourous' and she has just released her debut EP online.

Ayohcee: Music, many people feel, is “in their blood”. Is this true with you or did your interest in singing and song writing really only start in your teenage years?

Asya Satti: I definitely think singing is in the blood. According to my mum I'd lie on my back after having my nappy changed and 'croak' to myself for hours - I must have been enjoying what I was hearing! Lol! I started working on my singing technique in my teens and started songwriting around the age of 17.

AÓC: ‘Do You Think About Me,’ a song on your debut EP, has a distinctive Middle-Eastern feel to it. Do you make conscious attempt to stay in touch with your roots musically, or is it something that comes naturally to you?

AS: I try to avoid being to conscious about it as I don't want anything to come off too contrived. However I love a bit of Arabic music as it takes me back to my days in Egypt. I love listening to Sudanese, Congolese and reggae music - it's where I get a lot of melody ideas from.

AÓC: Songs such as ‘Bitch in the Bedroom’ and ‘Reputation’ reflect very normal situations that perhaps anyone could find himself or herself in. How important do you think that this is for singer-songwriters to do?

AS: I think its easier to relate to a song if you feel the person singing it has experienced it in some way, even if they experienced it through a friend. So I guess it doesn't have to be a normal situation, it just has to feel like whoever has written the song has connected to the message behind it.

AÓC: We often hear that the music industry is notoriously difficult to get into. Would you agree and do you see yourself as part of a business?

AS: I don't know if I would call it 'difficult', studying biology is what I call 'difficult'! Doing something you love doing never feels hard, but most of the challenges you face in the industry are how you feel about yourself and the material you're creating. It definitely makes you confront yourself a lot. Yes, I definitely see myself as part of a business.

AÓC: With your debut EP under recorded and available to download, what comes next for you both musically and in life more generally?

AS: An album for the end of September, lots of gigs over the summer. That's all I can get my head round at the moment!

Ayohcee would like to thank Asya for taking part in this interview. For more about her, including the songs referred to in the interview visit: www.asyamusic.com. You can also follow her on Twitter (@asyamusic).

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