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Galata Kulesi, Istanbul


"The city is difficult to write about for the same reasons the sea is difficult to paint." – Tobias Hill
The day after arriving in Istanbul, on a visit in early April, I had done what I often do when travelling, let my feet discover the city with no real planned destination.

Even in the Spring, the sun was quite warm and the skies and waters around Istanbul were ridiculously clear and blue – I'd even been able to spot dozens of small jellyfish swimming in the waters of the Golden Horn (Haliç in Turkish). 

Walking back from near Galata Tower (Galata Kulesi), I walked along the lower level of the Galata Bridge, stopping part the way along to take this picture from one of the central abutments. The blue is particularly vivid mainly due to the use of a polarising filter on the standard kit lens. 

What I loved about the image was how the city appears to be rising up in layers of varying levels of modernity, crowned by the top of the tower built by the Genoese in the 14th-century.

For more photography, follow me on Instagram: @ayohcee


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