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Showing posts from July, 2012

Nuruddin Farah @ Southbank Centre

Nuruddin Farah is someone who has only recently come onto my literary radar. I was gripped with the savage honesty with which he portrayed the struggles of a female in late-fifties and early-sixties Somalia through the eyes of the simple nomad girl, Ebla, in From a Crooked Rib.
Once again, the blessing of living in London meant that mid-week there was the opportunity to see him speak about his latest bookCrossbones and about Somalia in general as part of the Africa Utopia season at the Southbank Centre. Even though I originally missed the advert for the talk, my eagle-eyed friend Nasri Adam of Safara Trust informed me of it in the nick of time.
Sat patiently with Nasri, her colleague Elizabeth, and a diverse audience composed of many colours, creeds and nationalities, Farah’s entrance seemed so unassuming for a man who blatantly confronts the injustices of his own culture and the injustices inflicted upon his culture by outsiders.
Our chair for the talk, Maya Jaggi, introduced Farah …

The Bakiga Window Vol. II: Jebena, Cini, Bunna!

The captain’s voice, lilting with a slight American inflection, crackles over the intercom and thanks us for travelling with Ethiopian Airways. The students, most of whom have slept solidly throughout the journey, look groggily around with the realisation that we are in Africa.
It is the crack of dawn on Friday 30th March 2012 and I’ve arrived, accompanied by a group of thirty-one others, in Addis Ababa. The air is still cold, by African standards, but is getting warmer as the minutes pass by.
Once again we are in Addis to change planes; the first leg of the journey having brought us from Heathrow, and the second taking us from here to Kigali, Rwanda. Unfortunately, such journey itineraries seldom match up perfectly and we have a four-hour wait ahead of us.
It is something of a cruel trick that Ethiopian Airways play on us annually as we are led to the smaller of the two terminal buildings, away from the spacious glass and steel, air-conditioned luxury of the newer building, to look …