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Les Journaux Africains: Byoona Amagara, Lake Bunyonyi, Uganda - 19.31 10/04/2010

All photos © 2010, the author.
With the busy morning over, the day's tempo has finally dwindled to the pace it is now - slow and relaxing.

After setting off from Kigezi High with a mixture of UK and Ugandan students and staff, we arrived at the Byoona Amagara jetty on the southern edge of Lake Bunyonyi. Here, after unloading all of our gear for camping - including my cricket set - from the Kigezi bus, we immediately commenced to reload all of it onto the boats ready for the twenty minute journey to the island.

The boats seem completely unfit for the level of burden that we place upon them. Once they have taken on board our bodies, bags, bottled water and anything else we've accumulated en route, they sit incredibly low in the water. In fact, they sit so low, that should anyone so much as sneeze, the rocking looks as if it may risk capsizing the craft.

Regardless of the fuss our easily frightened students create, the journey inevitably went fine and upon our arrival on the island resort of Byoona Amagara - Rukiga for 'the complete life' - we were met by a smiling and friendly group of people, led by a man called Friday.

We wasted no time in unpacking the tents in the flat area of land towards the far end of the island. The size of this island has to be roughly ten times that of Sharpe's Island where we stayed last year.

Me and Matt were sharing a tent and had the thing put up in no time and started to assist the students and Ugandan staff to put up their tents - an entertaining process in itself. It took only a matter of minutes before Penninah was in hysterics, crying with laughter at the whole experience.

There was time in the afternoon to play cricket, much to my pleasure. The revelation of the game was a girl called Ruth who had a perfect bowling action and proceeded to show up not only me, but her male teachers too, with the pace of her deliveries.

After a short while being beaten at my own game, I headed to the waterside to swim. The water was as cold, clear and refreshing as ever. As the evening wore on, I relished the opportunity of defeating my students' challenges when playing Scrabble before moving on to have an interesting conversation about geography with Esther and Penninah. A complete life indeed.

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