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The Uganda Diaries: Kigezi High School, Kabale - 13.12 09/04/2009

So, here I am having taught a Senior 3 class. We used the ideas of creativity, break-out groups and peer-assessment to improve the quality of 'teaching and learning'. The lesson went particularly well if I am to judge by the students' reactions; they found it peculiar that they had to mark their own work though!

After this I went for a wander, in the sunshine, around the school compound. I was taking pictures and got talking to some Senior 4 girls and a couple of Senior 6 boys. What started with me talking about my love for Uganda with a few students soon changed and I had a crowd gathered around me, all listening to my every word and looking at the pictures on my camera. 

It was a lovely experience and an especially funny moment was when I taught the girls how to greet and respond in Irish Gaelic. They were all suitably impressed with my Rukiga greeting of "agandi" to which one responds "nycha"; alhtough it did garner some laughs!

I spoke at great length about how people in Uganda seemed so different to those in London; abou thow in Uganda people were more welcoming to strangers, whereas in London people mind their own business. This came as a great surprise to them as the teachers and students from William Morris seem so warm.

Following on from this discussion, or rather to conclude it, I let them have my best wishes for their up-coming exams. I stole away to find water and to sit in the sun and write.

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